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Leyland Motor Works ..Pancake Tuesday tradition
14-Apr-2003, 03:30 PM
Post: #1
Leyland Motor Works ..Pancake Tuesday tradition
Does anyone know why there was a tradition at Leyland motor works of letting the aprentices off work that day (Pancake Tuesday) after they had their faces blacked?[?]
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14-Apr-2003, 07:41 PM
Post: #2
 
Don`t know where it started, but someone will, just wait. We always went into work in the oldest clothes we could find within the bounds of decency. Graphite powder and grease aren`t right nice, and take a lot of getting off!! It wasn`t only faces...........!!! Cheerio,Bill.
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27-Apr-2003, 03:36 AM
Post: #3
 
I`ve been searching to find information about this topic Bill, but all I can find is the tradition of the Morris Men having black faces because of one of their traditions. Sandra.[Smile]

Dancers often "black up" -- ie, wear black face as a form of ritual disguise. In this age of political correctness, however, many teams skip this or else wear clown makeup or masks instead.
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29-Jan-2006, 11:34 PM
Post: #4
 
I was an apprentice at Leyland Motors and I remember one Pancake Tuesday when I was working in the nozzle shop. I don't know about Blacking but I do know that bearing blue was used on some parts of the body that doesn't bear remembering. Now that stuff took ages to get off.

B.H. Smalley
Auckland, New Zealand

Left Leyland in 1973
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01-Feb-2006, 04:06 PM
Post: #5
 
Working at North Works pre-war, we experienced "blacking" at the mercy of our peers. Lets not mention the parts blacked or blued with Prussian Blue, suffice it to say that on Shrove Tuesday morning, the apprentices were the worst dressed people on the plant; still, sacrifices had to be made to tradition, and you could always get your own back in later years. Methylated Spirit used to remove the Blue, but at some discomfort.

The tradition continued well into the war years, but does it survive to this day? I don`t know.

There were other traditional ceremonies within the workplace which did not survive the war years, particularly associated with a forthcoming marriage - really not for the Forum.

To be late for work generally meant being "hammered in" as you made your way to your workplace, with the productiion of tank brake drums, this became a very noisy affair. Incidentally, "hammering in" formed an essential part of the marriage ritual.!!!

How many readers had to climb the ladder? are there any left to tell the tale?
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16-Jun-2006, 07:10 AM
Post: #6
 
quote:

Originally posted by William R

Don`t know where it started, but someone will, just wait. We always went into work in the oldest clothes we could find within the bounds of decency. Graphite powder and grease aren`t right nice, and take a lot of getting off!! It wasn`t only faces...........!!! Cheerio,Bill.


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16-Jun-2006, 09:13 AM
Post: #7
 
Welcome to the Forum Bill,
that makes 3 of us in Beautiful B.C.

Hope you have lots of fun on the Forum.[Big Grin]

Ciao,
Karen.

T. D.
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31-Jan-2008, 12:58 AM
Post: #8
 
quote:

Originally posted by Barry Smalley

I was an apprentice at Leyland Motors and I remember one Pancake Tuesday when I was working in the nozzle shop. I don't know about Blacking but I do know that bearing blue was used on some parts of the body that doesn't bear remembering. Now that stuff took ages to get off.


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31-Jan-2008, 06:26 PM
Post: #9
 
We kept the pancake Tuesday blacking of apprentices going in the Boilershop up to 1979 think it most probably died with the demise of Leyland. We used to chase the lads around the factory then black their faces and parade them around with a collection box, then they went off home. Never grumbled about it they got a good collection and a day off.

I also remember when I got married I was working at Municipal appliances in Bamber Bridge. They wired a chamber pot up in the roof trusses and I had to climb up to release it with everyone banging on the noisiest things they could find.

Health and safety might not approve nowadays
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16-Mar-2016, 05:31 PM
Post: #10
RE: Leyland Motor Works ..Pancake Tuesday tradition
(01-Feb-2006 04:06 PM)William R Wrote:  Working at North Works pre-war, we experienced "blacking" at the mercy of our peers. Lets not mention the parts blacked or blued with Prussian Blue, suffice it to say that on Shrove Tuesday morning, the apprentices were the worst dressed people on the plant; still, sacrifices had to be made to tradition, and you could always get your own back in later years. Methylated Spirit used to remove the Blue, but at some discomfort.

The tradition continued well into the war years, but does it survive to this day? I don`t know.

There were other traditional ceremonies within the workplace which did not survive the war years, particularly associated with a forthcoming marriage - really not for the Forum.

To be late for work generally meant being "hammered in" as you made your way to your workplace, with the productiion of tank brake drums, this became a very noisy affair. Incidentally, "hammering in" formed an essential part of the marriage ritual.!!!

How many readers had to climb the ladder? are there any left to tell the tale?
Remember it very well indeed ,at south works in July 1955 .
What a height that ladder was and the chamber pot was secured very well indeed.
With a black painted eye inside it and the letters I C U P
the hammering noise was deafening , after all this was a sheet metal dept .
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