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Leyland's Industrial Past
19-Aug-2010, 10:54 AM
Post: #21
 
Thinking back, and at 85 I have a right to maybe make a mistake, when you went up Wheelton Lane towards what was the MOS Factory, you went past the end of the main building of L and B. Past the wooden gate was a low roofed building, which was said to be "Thats where they make the pipes for across the Channel". I believe later it was used for putting on the rubberised coating on plane fuel tanks, which when shot through, swelled and deformed to make a self sealing fuel tank. Saw that being done.

Btr on Golden Hill Lane - went there with the Engineering Society, and through the large wooden door and to the left they were assembling vehicle tyres, layer on layer on a large mandrel. It was then taken to the formers as a long tubular piece and formed and cured in a large circular press. I can remember how it had all the names and identification marks on, with the outside of the tyre tread having lots of small threads of rubber from the process on. We were interested to see that the tyre number was altered for each one, as one of the mundane taske at Leylands was to record the number of each tyre supplied with the War Dept Vehicle Specification.

Across the road from BTR was Leylands Land for the Farington Works on which the BX Factory was built, and later the Comet Shop, then storage plots.

I believe the back entrance to Iddon Bros was in Herbert Street because they had a big outside party there at the end if the War.
When you walked out of the back doors of the Case Hardening Dept it was a small roadway which led down to the bottom of North Works over which was a water storage lodge. At the bottom of the road was the Plating Dept run by Mr Taylor and Harry Jennings, further along was the two storey building of the Coppersmiths, run by Peter Conolley. Harry Jennings was the contact for finishing off and plating model planes in copper of Spifires, Hurricanes, Wellington Bombers. I believe the castings were bought in Corporation Street Preston. Harry`s price was 20 John Players. Made in spare time of course.

Opposite the Plating shop was a large cellar area where tyres and wheels were stored and assembled for passing upstairs to the Chassis Shop for assemby on Retreiver lorries. All a long time ago, Chassis Shop run by Jack Fairclough and Charlie Hill. Jack Fairclough was the Engineer for Parry Thomas.

I`ll leave it there, history from way back in 1939/40`s
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19-Aug-2010, 04:05 PM
Post: #22
 
I am unable to add anything positive to this thread, other than to pick up on a point made by William. In my archive work at the vehicle museum, I discovered that on ALL Scammell vehicles, EVERY tyre (from chassis No.1 onwards) was listed on the build sheets and each did indeed have it`s own serial number. Was this common practice amongst all tyre manufacturers, or could they have originated in Golden Hill Lane?

Jim
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19-Aug-2010, 04:33 PM
Post: #23
 
Just after WWII, George Damp & Sons had a filling station on Golden Hill, on the north side of the road about 100 yards east of Wheelton Lane. We moved to the junction of Canberra Road and Turpin Green when Leyland Motors bought up all the land for a new factory.


Frank

Frank Damp (wife Eileen, nee Nixon)
Leyland resident 1941-1965, emigrated to the US in 1968,
retired to Anacortes, Washington State, USA in 1999.
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19-Aug-2010, 07:07 PM
Post: #24
 
Yep Dan ... Jo Roocroft (was married to my cousin Margaret)
did fall the stack at Farington Mill.

T. D.
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19-Aug-2010, 08:09 PM
Post: #25
 
I have a contact in Oz who as well as being a good friend was a former boss of mine for a while at the Leyland site. I'm hoping he can remember more than I can as he spent a lot longer there than I did and was still located there until just before the closure of the site.
Jim I don't know a thing about the tyres, sorry. I started after tyre production commenced but maybe somebody will have knowledge.
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20-Aug-2010, 12:57 PM
Post: #26
 
When we moved from the bottom of Church Road to Hargreaves Avenue in 1961, I could see as many as six factory chimneys from my bedroom window. As far as I can remember, they were Brook Mill, Farington Mill, BTR, Leyland Motors, L&B and I think Farington Foundary.

I can't remember if Iddon Brothers has a chimney, but suspect not.

Still there but out of sight was Earnshaw Bridge Mill and maybe Mount Pleasant Mill, too.

My abiding memory of the latter was a glimpse as we passed on the bus along the back of the mill, and through an open door I could see a team of men with lump hammers smashing up the looms. Must have been late 50s, and the building was later occupied by Leyprint and Oliver's Socket Screws.

CD
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20-Aug-2010, 01:26 PM
Post: #27
 
This is what my friend came up with, I think it's a good effort considering it was 38 years ago!!

[Image: BTRGoldenHillLane.jpg]
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20-Aug-2010, 01:41 PM
Post: #28
 
Regarding Damp's Garage and Filling Station, If my memory serves me right he specialised in Motor Cycles, also quite near the Garage, Hodges had a coal Merchants yard. As a schoolboy swome 70 years ago I used to walk home from Yewlands Drive, along school Lane to Wheeldon Lane and that long Building William speaks about was used as a plant for making baloons as further along the Lane they used to dirch white clay molds that had been broken. The Mill in Earnshaw Bridge was owned by the Pilkington Family ands during the war wove parachute material
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20-Aug-2010, 04:23 PM
Post: #29
 
We didn't do much at the Golden Hill station than sell petrol and repair tyres, Dan. Two of my uncles were mechanics, and they ran the auto repair and service located in the high-bay building that was behind our retail hardware store on Towngate. Another uncle did body repair and painting in another building behind the shop. I don't remember any motorcycle work (except on my bikes! but that was much later).


Frank

Frank Damp (wife Eileen, nee Nixon)
Leyland resident 1941-1965, emigrated to the US in 1968,
retired to Anacortes, Washington State, USA in 1999.
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20-Aug-2010, 05:50 PM
Post: #30
 
Noel, your reference to PLUTO fired my interest and despite a load of research, I couldn`t find any link to Leyland. I don`t doubt your information for a moment, but can`t understand the lack of any reference. I actually ended up with more questions then I set out to answer. Apparently the transatlantic telephone cable was adopted as a carrier of the fuel. ?????? Yes, I didn`t understand that either - unless it was the principal of the outer armoured covering that was `borrowed`. It had to stand 100lb/sq inch at ALL times , including during MANUFACTURER.
I`ve got this awful feeling that I won`t rest until I know all the answers (just like Avril`s song [Tongue][Tongue] which of course is still unsolved.)

Jim
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