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Preston Dairies
23-Oct-2012, 12:28 PM
Post: #11
 
Johnny Miller's was a one-man-band, I think. He used to deliver to us when we lived at No 7 Church Road in the '50s, but sold up and took a (short-lived) cafe at Bamber Bridge.

We had Preston Dairies after that, until we moved to Hargreaves Avenue in 1961 when George Norris came round canvassing for business. He'd had a dairy farm of his own and still lived in the farmhouse right by the railway line a few hundred yards towards Euxton from Bent Bridge. But by that time they'd built Eskdale Road on it, and he bought his milk from Preston Dairies, too, and re-sold it to his customers.

Meantime, my friend Roger Jackson's family always got their milk from Hesketh's who had a bigish fairy farm pretty well on the corner of Wigan Road and Dawson Lane and had a horse-drawn float right up to the mid '60s. I remember their getting a van instead, and when Hilda Jackson asked her milkman how he was getting on with it, he said it was OK, but the snag was you couldn't smack a van on the backside and it would go to the next customer's house and wait for you!

Does anyone remember a dairy farmer who used to come round with a churn (well a "kit" actually) of milk on a pony and trap? I remember seeing housewives in Vevey Street coming out of their back gates with jugs in their hands, which he'd fill up from a metal measure on a long handle which he's dip into the milk. Health and Safety eat your heart out!

CD
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23-Oct-2012, 12:29 PM
Post: #12
 
Whoops, typo! Heskeths had a DAIRY farm!!!

CD
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23-Oct-2012, 07:27 PM
Post: #13
 
Colin,
When I was a kid we got our milk from George Norris Senior at Carter's farm (as you say by the railway) He had his milk in kits and my mother would go to his float with a jug to be filled.
DW
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24-Oct-2012, 06:23 PM
Post: #14
 
I helped Norman Tattersall to deliver milk in the late 1950s when he used a horse and cart. The horse's name was Prince and he lived to be 30 years old. Prince knew his way round the milkround which was very useful until a new customer came or an old one cancelled and he just carrried on with his usual route leaving me or Norman behind. Previously, Norman had delivered milk using a pony and trap which carried milk churns. He ladelled the milk from the churns directly to the customer's milk jug. When milk was delivered in bottles we used to bottle the milk at the farm in Paradise Lane. The milk came straight from the cow, through a cooler and directly into the bottles which were filled and capped by hand. No pasteurising!
Brian
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29-Oct-2012, 12:43 AM
Post: #15
 
Id have loved to be around in these days-i bet there was a great community spirit?
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29-Oct-2012, 09:51 AM
Post: #16
 
My opinion is that, in many ways, life was very similar then to how it is now. Sometimes there was a great community spirit for the annual processions and community events such as the Queen's Coronation. We were still in the shadow of the war so it was a time of austerity. We did not have the material possessions that we have today but we did not know anything different. The class system was much stronger then along with male female inequalities and colour prejudice. Looking back on my childhood, I thoroughly enjoyed it as many of today's children enjoy theirs. Yes, there are many differences but there also many similarities.
It was certainly not a 'golden age.'
Regards,
Brian
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30-Oct-2012, 05:59 PM
Post: #17
 
Thora Hird said in her autobiography that when people said "Things aren't how they used to be" she would reply "No. Duvets, automatic washing machines and Marks & Spencer".

Personally, I've always stuck by the title of a song in the musical "La Cage aux Folles". It's called "The Best of Times is NOW"

CD
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06-Dec-2012, 01:56 AM
Post: #18
 
quote:

Originally posted by Colin Damp

Thora Hird said in her autobiography that when people said "Things aren't how they used to be" she would reply "No. Duvets, automatic washing machines and Marks & Spencer".

Personally, I've always stuck by the title of a song in the musical "La Cage aux Folles". It's called "The Best of Times is NOW"




In these straitened times, I suspect that not many people would agree with that Colin, especially after today's Statement. Or am I interpreting the quote too literally?
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06-Dec-2012, 10:29 AM
Post: #19
 
quote:

Originally posted by Bill

quote:

Originally posted by Colin Damp


Thora Hird said in her autobiography that when people said "Things aren't how they used to be" she would reply "No. Duvets, automatic washing machines and Marks & Spencer".

Personally, I've always stuck by the title of a song in the musical "La Cage aux Folles". It's called "The Best of Times is NOW"




In these straitened times, I suspect that not many people would agree with that Colin, especially after today's Statement. Or am I interpreting the quote too literally?



The name of the musical is very apt though ! [8D]
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27-Dec-2012, 06:39 PM
Post: #20
 
I used to work for Peet's at Cuerden Farm on Wigan Rd.
It was run & owned by Jim Peet ( now deceased ) & his two sons worked on the farm Dave & Phil.
Jack Heywood bought milk from us every day, I even remember his order it was 3 crates of green top ( ayreshire milk ) & 1 crate Jersey ( green top with a gold stripe )

The milk then was simply milked from the cows, carried in a milk kit ( churn to who doesnt know the real name for it ), sieved then cooled over a surface cooler then sieved again and then bottled.
It was the best milk you could get.

Sadly the farm is no longer a dairy farm.
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