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Preston Dairies
28-Dec-2012, 11:05 AM
Post: #21
 
That must have been the Jersey milk we were buying Glynn and by eck it was good. Sadly the powers that be decided we didn't like cream settling on the top of the milk and took the fun out of it by homogenising. Probably something to do with the EU that appears to take the fun out of everything in life and replace it with a droll PC drabness. Not that I am biased. Is Peets on the left as you pass Lydiate Lane heading towards Moss Lane?
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28-Dec-2012, 03:59 PM
Post: #22
 
Milk homogenisation pre-dates the EU by at least a decade, I think. I remember it being an option before we emigrated.


Frank

Frank Damp (wife Eileen, nee Nixon)
Leyland resident 1941-1965, emigrated to the US in 1968,
retired to Anacortes, Washington State, USA in 1999.
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28-Dec-2012, 04:34 PM
Post: #23
 
Wasn't that UHT milk Frank, the bottles that had metal beer type caps on them? Milk certainly had cream on the top in the seventies. Supermarkets maybe to blame for it with their plastic containers.
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28-Dec-2012, 06:56 PM
Post: #24
 
Noel, your Mrs wouldn't allow you Green top these days ! [Wink]
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29-Dec-2012, 04:42 AM
Post: #25
 
No, Noel, that stuff with the pop-bottle caps on was sterilised milk, and tasted awful! We've become used to homogenised milk (it's all that's available here), but we can get full cream, reduced fat (2% milk fat), low-fat (1%) and fat free. There's no doorstep delivery in our town, so we buy plastic one-gallon jugs (US Gallon) at the supermarket or at Costco and we use the 1% version for cholesterol reasons. We pay about $2.50 for a gallon, a bit cheaper at Costco.

My recollection was that, after homogenisation became available, you could still get the non-homogenised version. I remember my Dad always opening a fresh bottle so he could get the cream on his morning cereal. I don't think the non-homogenised option disappeared until the late 1960s.

Frank

Frank Damp (wife Eileen, nee Nixon)
Leyland resident 1941-1965, emigrated to the US in 1968,
retired to Anacortes, Washington State, USA in 1999.
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29-Dec-2012, 11:23 AM
Post: #26
 
My minds a bit of a blur 40 years ago but I'm certain we were buying non homogenised when we bought our first home in October 1970, the Jersey milk we bought had a thick yellow cream on top.
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29-Dec-2012, 04:00 PM
Post: #27
 
You're probably correct if you were buying Jersey milk. That was a luxury we didn't go for.


Frank

Frank Damp (wife Eileen, nee Nixon)
Leyland resident 1941-1965, emigrated to the US in 1968,
retired to Anacortes, Washington State, USA in 1999.
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29-Dec-2012, 07:46 PM
Post: #28
 
I don't think the Jersey milk was even pasteurised, I'm sure I remember Jack telling us that. You can still get non-homogenised from certain farms but none near me unfortunately.
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13-Jan-2013, 07:24 PM
Post: #29
 
All green top & green/gold ( jersey & guernsey or CI ) was unpastureised.
The stuff in glass bottles today with a silver top is pasteurised & the cream will settle on it, all others i.e. red top (semi skimmed ) the cream won't settle.

Unpastureised is still available, sadly they have put too many rules in place that few farmers still do it.
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13-Jan-2013, 10:59 PM
Post: #30
 
In the 1970s in Christchurch NZ I noticed the cream wasn't rising up to the tops of the bottles so I wrote to the paper and got an invitation to tour the treatment station.The food technologist explained that the pasteurisation process in use which was a rapid heating and cooling broke up the fat globules to nano size which prevented them from accreting to the same extent as previous processing techniques.Now my doctor says cut down on animal fat and I think he's right so I get zero fat milk and zero fat yogurt mix for the yogurt maker.
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