Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
leyland motors 1969 onwards
14-Oct-2015, 02:17 PM
Post: #11
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
My uncle Ron Nixon worked in the Leyland insurance offices for a number of years and his wife was a Barker, I think her brother was Ron Barker, Lord Stokes was a premium apprentice in the days when rich families bought their offsprings an apprenticeship, he went on to the top and was a super salesman steering Leyland Motors to the biggest bus and truck business in the world, then the accountants took over and ruined the business, it was sales driven under Stokes when accountants took over it became money over sales then the rot set in..........

djh
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
14-Oct-2015, 03:56 PM (This post was last modified: 14-Oct-2015 04:01 PM by anacortesdamp.)
Post: #12
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
I knew your uncle Ron quite well, Dave. He and my uncle Ron (Baker, not Barker) were joint leaders of the Boys Brigade at Turpin Green Methodist Church. He and his wife (my Dad's younger sister, Bessie) lived at 31 Balcarres Road, one of a pair of semis after the long row of terraced houses that ran from the Church Road end of Balcarres Rd. There was a street running up to Sandy Lane that separated them, but I can't remember the name.

I've always considered it was the Wilson government that started the rot at Leyland Motors, when they forced LML to merge with BMC (Austin & Morris). The reorganisation allowed the militant Midlands union shop stewards to invade and start their trouble-making. Prior to that, LML had a fairly trouble-free relationship with its union work-force.


Frank
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
14-Oct-2015, 08:28 PM
Post: #13
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
Agreed Frank the Wilson government had their part to play to save the likes of GKN and other ancillary parts suppliers but they also brought the managers from the the same failed midlands groups who were to say the least CRAP, we must look at who were the most responsible for running the company unions or the management, my view is the management run the company not the unions, at Leylands the most stoppage was the 6 week strike that I felt was not enough to ruin a company the strength of the giant company that the likes of Lord stokes helped to build and I had the privilege of working for for 21 years as a night convener and a staff rep as well as being a worker, a few of the directors ripped off the most lucrative parts of the business and moved production to their own companies namely Thornicrofts being one of the midlands directors own companies, a lot of this is not know to the general public ,plus a number of director ripoffs that I cannot number here to furnish their own personal way of life not associated with the companies business, a total disgrace....................

djh
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
14-Oct-2015, 10:38 PM (This post was last modified: 14-Oct-2015 10:40 PM by anacortesdamp.)
Post: #14
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
Did the Wilson government force the merger with British Motor Corporation, Dave? That was certainly the impression I had. In the end, all the BMC names went down the river, leaving just the Rover brand name (which was an LML subsidiary from the late 1960s on).

I don't know what PACCAR originally planned to do with Leyland Trucks after they bought it. Last time I went to the open day (maybe 5 years ago) at their R&D facility about 15 miles from here, they still had Foden, Leyland and DAF logos on the reception area wall.

I understand that the Scottish Leyland factory that Volvo Commercial Vehicles bought still makes double-deckers, but they don't label them as "Volvo-Leyland" any more. We see a few Dennis three-axle double-deckers around the greater Seattle area. Everett-based Community transit has about 30 of them that are used on express inter-city commuter runs to and from Seattle. CT reckons they can get more people in 40' of street space than the 65-foot articulated single-deckers used by other operators.


Frank
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
15-Oct-2015, 06:43 AM
Post: #15
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
Frank, they certainly did force the merger with BMC as I explained, it was to save the ancillary suppliers such as GKN and others from going to the wall, my son in law still works at the Paccar Plant and it keeps producing trucks of other makers but I have no knowledge of the makers names, they are a vastly depleated work force from the old days when I worked there in 84............

djh
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
15-Oct-2015, 03:24 PM
Post: #16
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
It's possible that they're still making some of the Leyland designs, but they probably carry one of PACCAR's other brand names. I don't think they'd use Kenworth or Peterbilt, as those are the big US Class 8 tractor/trailer trucks. I'm not familiar with other names they own. Most of the test rigs we see are Kenworths, out on the roads from the Development Center.

We don't see many smaller trucks around here other than Oriental manufacturer models, some of which carry Chevrolet or GMC badges.


Frank
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
17-Oct-2015, 10:54 PM
Post: #17
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
Stokes was my dads apprentice when he wasa premium app he had an old BSA bantam my dad had a Scott motor cycle.when my dad retired after working 50 year at the motors in 1966 lord stokes did a presentation of a gold watch at Blackpool tower ballroom. He said he was jealous of my dad with his better motor cycle all those years back.like someone said the BMC merger was the start of the rot .sad really when you think of the good name Leyland commercials had.
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
18-Oct-2015, 03:17 PM (This post was last modified: 18-Oct-2015 03:20 PM by anacortesdamp.)
Post: #18
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
Lenova:

Scott made some excellent motorcycles for their time. A workmate at EE-Warton had a "Flying Squirrel" - an odd name, but a good bike. I think it was immediate pre-WW2 as it had girder front forks and a rigid rear end. I was riding a 150 Vespa at the time (1959). Scott went out of business in the mid-1950s, I think.

As I remember, Stokes was well-liked by the workers, but that might have changed after the BMC merger fiasco and his elevation to the peerage.

Frank Damp
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
19-Oct-2015, 09:32 AM
Post: #19
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
I think there's about 1000 work at the Farmington Paccar factory. I pass it most days. Gone are the days when Leyland gridlocked as the factories closed for the day.
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
19-Oct-2015, 01:22 PM
Post: #20
RE: leyland motors 1969 onwards
As I remember, Noel, the employment at LML facilites in and around Leyland, before the BMC disaster, was up around 30,000, but I'm sure someone else has a more accurate number. There was a dedicated parking area at the factory site on Golden Hill Lane for employee-owned buses.

Around 1950, George Damp & Sons had a petrol station on that property (a 100 yards or so east of Wheelton Lane). The land was sold to LML (along with a lot more land than we had) for that factory and we built a replacement station at the junction of Canberra Road and Turpin Green. Our set-up was across the apex of the junction. It later became Bob Barton's and had a car wash as well. I think one of the "Tesco Mini" shops is there now. Canberra Road didn't get paved all the way through to Balshaw's until about 1954.


Frank
Find all posts by this user
Add Thank You Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)