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Balshaw's Grammar School
19-Jun-2002, 04:51 PM
Post: #31
 
What memories. I was never that fond of Balshaw's. I made the choice of engineering as a career, so everyone except Bill Rigby (Physics) wrote me off. I had requested Pure Maths, Applied Maths and Physics as my 6th form subjects and was enrolled for French, English and Latin! Mr. Oldland thought I was better at languages and being an interpreter would be a better career. I'd failed O-level Latin!

Unfortunately, I got off on the wrong foot with Mr. Wilkinson, who took me for both Maths subjects. His first report card (Christmas) said I'd never be any good at Maths, so I should leave and get a job. I went to English Electric as a student apprentice the following April.

It was interesting to see the changes between my years there and my brother Colin's, who came through 8 years later. There were only about three staff members who taught me still on the staff when he went. When I started, there were several who had been at the original Balshaw's school on the corner of Golden Hill and School Lane who had taught my Dad.

I can imagine Brom getting a bit ticked at someone doing their homework on a Sunday! She was a local preacher in the Methodist Church circuit. I got to know her fairly well after leaving school since we were members of the Turpn Green Church - she was a lot nicer socially. She died fairly recently in her mid-90's, I think.


Frank Damp
Anacortes

Frank Damp (wife Eileen, nee Nixon)
Leyland resident 1941-1965, emigrated to the US in 1968,
retired to Anacortes, Washington State, USA in 1999.
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20-Jun-2002, 12:18 AM
Post: #32
 
I remembered two other things after my last posting.

Mrs. Pickersgill's maiden name was Hutchings, not Probert. I had Miss Probert as home-room teacher in 1C - we were in the pre-fab building on the bank behind the boys toilets and bike shed. I don't remember her much after that first year - certainly she didn't teach any of my classes.

I think the teacher who used crutches was the art teacher, Miss Whewell. Because of limited mobility, I don't think she taught any other subjects. I believe she died in 1959 or '60, while my sister was still at Balshaw's. I remember Wilkie and Mr. Wilson doing Maths. Mr. Wilson also did history, along with Mr. Morgan.


Frank Damp

Frank Damp (wife Eileen, nee Nixon)
Leyland resident 1941-1965, emigrated to the US in 1968,
retired to Anacortes, Washington State, USA in 1999.
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21-Jun-2002, 09:23 AM
Post: #33
 
Mr Oldland.Now there's a blast from the past.Things were tough in those days.
Victor Ustace made us all learn the 53rd Chapter of Isaiah off by heart and talked incessantly about vicarious suffering.For about 50 ten or eleven year olds it was all very enlightening.You will appreciate that Noel from your St Ambrose experience.
I remember he questioned our whole form one by one cos someone put orange peel in the classroom bin.Small beer when you consider the misdemeanors today.We were terrified.He had these metal heel tips which clattered and he paced up and down gown a flutter.
I only stood up to him once .That was the day I left.
My sister was sent to Penwortham Girls' as I'd blotted the family copy book.
Miss Whewell was always the Art teacher while I was there and played a mean game of tennis at that time.In fact Tennis is my best memory.
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21-Jun-2002, 10:14 AM
Post: #34
 
quote:

.He had these metal heel tips which clattered and he paced up and down gown a flutter.





I remember those steel tips well. Every morning as we sat in assembly waiting for him to arrive there would suddenly be a click of the steel tips and we knew he was in the hall. Entry of the gladiator. He retired before I left and Mr. Bleasdale took over.

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21-Jun-2002, 12:35 PM
Post: #35
 
Frank ,everyone got on the wrong side of Wilky but he could draw perfect concentric circles.
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21-Jun-2002, 07:06 PM
Post: #36
 
I only just discivered this topic! I think I remember 'Tosh' at Balshaw's- I left in 65 , did anyone do Art with Ralph May?
The teacher with the crutches was Miss Lewis, always preceded into the classroom by a girl carrying her bag..she used to say of Algabra problems 'This one's rather Fun!!' which it wasn't..
Miss Whewell had a rather fine moustache, we had to design interlacing strapwork....
'Daddy' Bull used to have milkbottles in the window of his house. At the beginning of each term he had a clean suit which we used to watch being slowly stained over the weeks with various substances. He used to write poems about his girl pupils, apparantly...
Mr.Wilkinson said he could take a budgie and it would be able to repeat by now what he'd been telling me-'but you can't, Johnson!'Called me a toad and sent me out in the corridor for weeping, luckier young girls got taken to Blackpool on days out- yes I remember the Photography bur wasn't going to mention it!......

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21-Jun-2002, 08:03 PM
Post: #37
 
There were a few excentric male teachers there, Wilson being one.
Daddy Bull debating whether you should use a comma or a semi-colon.
Wilkie used to hold the chess circle and took great pride in playing us all at once, spending about 5 seconds at each board.
Always won!! Remember Wilson chasing a wasp around the room with a window pole. Never got to really like Mr. Hilditch there was something grim about him, however walking my dog through the woods in 1987 or 88 I came across him going for a stroll. He remembered me from 1963 O level General Studies-I think all the class failed , it was a big disaster, the only O I failed. However we exchanged pleasantries . Sadly a few months later I read he had died.

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22-Jun-2002, 10:30 AM
Post: #38
 
I am flattered that you all miss my contributions so much but I do have a very interesting and time consuming job to do. My work now is concerned with behaviour support in schools. I know so much about bad behaviour from my time at Balshaws and looking at the comments in this forum I learned most of it from you.
I have fond memories of Mr Wilson when he produced the school plays. He was never my subject teacher so when I helped him with his Cecil B. de Mille productions, mainly backstage, it was easier to have some fun with him. I remember once dropping a ball of string on his head when I was up a ladder fixing some scenery on the stage. The Mikado, The Importance of being Earnest and Pygmalion are the productions I was involved with. Actually had a small part in Pygmalion. I feel terrible about about not remembering Noel. I travel over to Leyland quite regularly and as you live nearby, perhaps I should call in sometime and buy you a pint. I enjoy reading all your postings.
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22-Jun-2002, 10:51 AM
Post: #39
 
quote:

. I feel terrible about about not remembering Noel. I travel over to Leyland quite regularly and as you live nearby, perhaps I should call in sometime and buy you a pint. I enjoy reading all your postings.




Don't worry about it Brian, more important things in life. You probably wouldn't recognise me now anyway, Stuart Parker didn't.
Do you remember my wife Margaret Iddon from Dunkirk Lane, 3 years younger than us. She works for Lancashire Educational Psychology Dept. now dealing with problem children, as a secretary though , merely issuing reports.

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23-Jun-2002, 03:20 AM
Post: #40
 
Wilkie can't have been all that bad, I never did well in maths at Balshaws, but just a year or two later I ended up teaching maths to the dimmos in my year at Harris 'Tec while the lecturer got on with the rest of the class. I never failed a year at the 'Tec so some of Wilkies lessons must have sunk in. I remember well that he always wrote in bright green ink.
Mr. Hildich was indeed very strange, but I think it was sarcasm really, to deep for my mind to comprehend. But again, he must have kindled something in me, history is the one subject I read about all the time, can't get enough of it.
They were certainly a bunch of eccentrics, sometimes terrifying, always entertaining.
John
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