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Leyland Senior School. Pre-War.
15-Aug-2005, 07:36 PM
Post: #1
Leyland Senior School. Pre-War.
I do not intend to start a thread here, but having just watched the final day of the Test Match at Old Trafford against the Australians, I wonder if anyone on the Forum remembers Mr. A.B.Church, Headmaster of the prewar school?

At our final day at Easter in 1939, Mr.Church addressed all us 14yr.olds who were leaving to go into the world of Industry and Commerce. One of his final acts was to give us advice, in the form of a poem, which he delivered with great clarity. It was called Vitae Lampada by Sir Henry Newbolt, which follows here. In the spirit of the Test Match, I feel that there is nothing more appropriate, for today and the future.

VITAE LAMPADA.

There`s a breathless hush on the Close tonight
Ten to make and the match to win.
A bumping pitch and a blinding light,
An hour to play and the last man in.
And its not for the sake of a ribboned coat
or the selfish hope of a Season`s fame.
But his Captains hand on his shoulder smote
"Play up! Play up! and play the Game!"

The sand of the desert is sodden red,
Red with the wreck of the square that broke.
The gatlin`s jammed and the Colonel dead,
And the Regiment blind with dust and smoke.
The River of Death has brimmed its banks,
and Englands far and Honor a name.
But the voice of a schoolboy rallies the ranks
"Play up! Play up! and play the Game!".

This is the Word that year by year,
While in her place the school is set,
Everyone of her sons must hear,
And none that hears it dare forget.
This they all with joyful mind
and bear through life like a torch in flame,
falling, fling to the host behind -
"Play up! Play up! and play the Game!".

By Sir Henry Newbolt.

I have never forgotten his words from all those years ago, and I`m sure that wherever Mr.Church is on high, he will see that many of us 14yr.olds remembered his final words of advice to us.

I wonder if there are any left who remember this?

I think it is a good thought for the final day of the Test.

William R.
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15-Aug-2005, 09:04 PM
Post: #2
 
William I remember Mr. Church but many years after you. Its a pity those values are not taught today.
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08-Sep-2005, 02:29 AM
Post: #3
 
William,thanks for the poem, excellent. My wife Barbara ( currently recovering from a knee joint replacement), says that she went to the senior school for a short period prior to going to Chorley GS, she thought hightly of Mr. Church, a strict but fair man she says, also she recalls Mr. Hall the music teacher.
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08-Sep-2005, 09:38 AM
Post: #4
 
Allen, My late wife was one of the girls of Chorley Grammar School, she got a scholarship in 1935/6 to go, and stayed until she was 18 in 1942, when she had to make the choice to go into the services or into industry, she chose the latter and joined Leyland Motors by virtue of being on the right bus. The alternative was to go to Leyland and Birmingham Rubber, if she`d done that my life would have been entirely different!!!

Would this have been when your wife was there? she was Margaret Caunce in those days, Im not sure which House she was in, but the discipline was very strict on those days. She was in the school Hockey Team and then played for Leyland Motors.
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08-Sep-2005, 01:53 PM
Post: #5
 
My hubby Frank,remembers both Mr Church and Mr Hall, His best memories of Mr Hall are being told off for laughing at a poor girl's singing (she had had singing lessons) and then the final indignity Frank was told to mime and not make a sound when the school were singing in public.When he sings at home I know exactly where Mr Hall was coming from !!!
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09-Sep-2005, 12:34 AM
Post: #6
 
Thanks Audrey, Barb's just out of hospital, I'm chief cook, bottle washer errand runner, washing m/c operator and physiotherapist !

She's in pain but better each day.
Barbs sister Marjorie ( then Glover) apparently had a very good voice and Mr.Hall assisted and trained her to sing soloist at a 'Battle of Britain concert' at the Royal Hippodrome Preston in the early fifties.
William, Barb also attended Chorley GS in the early fifties.,prior to commencing at nursing college.
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30-Jan-2006, 01:16 PM
Post: #7
 
Hi Everyone, I have been following this forum and thought I may add my "sixpence worth"
I attended Leyland Secondaty Modern from 1944 to 1947.
I remember Mr Church and have always had great respect for him (I had the experience of to strokes of the cane on one occasion). I remember him as one of the best maths teachers I ever had. He only took classes occasionally. There was a Miss Annie Whitehead, Mr Oddy was the woodwork teacher, he was a very accurate slipper thrower if you turned around in class.
I lived in Euxton in these school years and often wonder what became of my school friends.
I remember being madly in love (she never knew) with an athletic girl we called "Dante" because she could run like the wind.
George Bannister, Ronnie Frost may jog someones memories.
I would love to renew contact with any pupil from that era.

BillFiles
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30-Jan-2006, 03:22 PM
Post: #8
 
I also attended the Senior School in the early forties and had some good times there. Albert Barthomelew Church we always said his name was although in reality we had no idea what the initials A abd B stood for. Mr Church lived on Canberra Road at the junction of Windsor Avenue and you are right BillFiles AB Church was an excellent teacher but regretfully only managed to go into class on rare occassions. I remember Mr Hall who taught music and although I never took a lot of interest in music when at school I eventually played for a number of years in the Leyland British Legion Brass Band and the Parish Church Band in later years until I did my National Service.
Mr Oddy was, as you say, very accurate with anything to hand if you misbehaved and so also was Les Hocking. I remember Mr Bretherton the woodwork teacher who eventually moved to a school in the Lake District, was it Coniston?
Remember Miss Farington who after retiring from the school eventually married Mr Church.
BillFiles were you one of the 'Euxton Lot' who came by Fishwicks bus every morning from the estate at the Royal Ordnance Factory ? I knew a Bob Branston from there.
Who remembers that old glider that was brought to the school for some unknown reason and placed behind those two temporary huts used for classrooms.
And lets not forget the initiation ceremonies with the newcomers each autumn. The Pole, The Bars and the Feather Bed. In this day and age of ultra protection for the kids there would be a riot if any one of these ceremonies took place.
Memories, memories memeories. One of the splendid things about getting older is that you acquire memories both good and bad and one can always look back to the good times and think - Yes the old times were the best - maybe.
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31-Jan-2006, 01:21 PM
Post: #9
 
quote:

Originally posted by tonytony

I also attended the Senior School in the early forties and had some good times there. Albert Barthomelew Church we always said his name was although in reality we had no idea what the initials A abd B stood for. Mr Church lived on Canberra Road at the junction of Windsor Avenue and you are right BillFiles AB Church was an excellent teacher but regretfully only managed to go into class on rare occassions. I remember Mr Hall who taught music and although I never took a lot of interest in music when at school I eventually played for a number of years in the Leyland British Legion Brass Band and the Parish Church Band in later years until I did my National Service.
Mr Oddy was, as you say, very accurate with anything to hand if you misbehaved and so also was Les Hocking. I remember Mr Bretherton the woodwork teacher who eventually moved to a school in the Lake District, was it Coniston?
Remember Miss Farington who after retiring from the school eventually married Mr Church.
BillFiles were you one of the 'Euxton Lot' who came by Fishwicks bus every morning from the estate at the Royal Ordnanace Factory ? I knew a Bob Branston from there.
Who remembers that old glider that was brought to the school for some unknown reason and placed behind those two temporary huts used for classrooms.
And lets not forget the initiation ceremonies with the newcomers each autumn. The Pole, The Bars and the Feather Bed. In this day and age of ultra protection for the kids there would be a riot if any one of these ceremonies took place.
Memories, memories memeories. One of the splendid things about getting older is that you acquire memories both good and bad and one can always look back to the good times and think - Yes the old times were the best - maybe.



BillFiles
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31-Jan-2006, 01:40 PM
Post: #10
 
Hi Tony,
Yes I was from the Euxton lot ,lived on Rose Hill Estate not far from the Bay Horse.
How well I remember the Pole, That was my intro to the initiation.
Mr Church's name was Albert Bath Church. Very fitting initials for his occupation.
The only contacts I have had in recent years is a friend called Malcolm Norris from Leyland.
He was in Australia last year, and Jason Robinsons wife Amanda and family spent an afternoon with us last year whist he was playing Rugby. I am hoping to come over this next year to see what they are doing to my village.
RGDS for Now
Bill

BillFiles
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